The history of witches in britain

The History of Witches in Britain

Though there are few surviving written records of the history of witches in Britain, we do know that witches were active in Britain during the Medieval period, and that belief in witches and witchcraft in Britain spans all the way back to antiquity. Prior to the infamous witch trials, witches in Britain were considered healers, herbalists, helpers of the community. Many people sought them out when they needed salves or potions to cure ailments. Before witches came to be associated with the devil in Britain’s modern period, people who practiced healing magic were called the Cunning Folk and were highly revered in society.


The Cunning Folk

The Cunning Folk in Britain were believed to have existed from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. They were practitioners of folk magic – not to be confused with ceremonial magic – and often hired by the people in their towns for the purposes of healing, fortune-telling, love spells, finding lost objects and missing persons, catching criminals, and even aiding in fighting off bewitchments from ceremonial or ritual witchcraft practitioners. 

Though today, we would still classify this practice as witchcraft, the Cunning Folk were often staunchly opposed to ceremonial witchcraft and were typically practicing Christians. As said above, they were healers, not hinderers – which is what they believed witches to be. According to Ronald Hutton, a British historian that specializes in British folklore, in his book, “The Triumph of the Moon,” the Cunning Folk were, “concerned not with the mysteries of the universe and the empowerment of the magus, so much as with practical remedies for specific problems.” 


Laws Against Witchcraft

Due to his controversial English Reformation, in which King Henry VIII broke from the Catholic Church, many in Tudorian society believed that his shirking of Rome brought about anti-Christian forces, such as witchcraft. It was widely believed at the time that his religious reformation would cause witches in Britain to be able to cause the death of a monarch.

In an attempt to smooth over the controversy, Henry VIII enacted Britain’s very first law against witchcraft, called The Witchcraft Act, in 1542. This law stated that witchcraft was a crime punishable by death.

The Witchcraft Act eventually fell to disuse upon Henry’s death in 1547 and was only replaced  16 years later, by Elizabeth I’s Act Against Conjuring, Enchantments, and Witchcraft in 1563. This act established that causing harm or death to anyone by way of witchcraft was a capital offense. 

Following Elizabeth I’s death, her successor, James I broadened her original law by making any act of witchcraft punishable by death. His law was entitled An Act Against Conjuration, Witchcraft, and Dealing With Evil and Wicked Spirits. It was during James I’s reign that the British witch hunts reached their peak.


Mother Waterhouse, the First Execution

Elizabeth I’s anti-witchcraft law claimed its first victim in 1566. Agnes Waterhouse, also called Mother Waterhouse, was the first woman to be executed for witchcraft in England. In 1566, in Chelmsford, Essex, England, three women were brought to trial for witchcraft. Elizabeth Francis was the first accused who admitted to practicing witchcraft taught to her by her grandmother, along with her familiar, a white cat named Satan. Elizabeth then told her accusers that she gave the cat to Agnes Waterhouse, and taught her witchcraft.

Agnes also admitted to having practiced, stating that Satan, the cat, spoke to her, and for a drop of her blood would do anything she wanted. She stated she used Satan to kill her neighbor’s livestock after an argument. She was also accused of killing a man by way of witchcraft but denied these claims. Next, Anges’ daughter, Joan Waterhouse, was also accused of using witchcraft to scare her neighbor, 12-year-old Agnes Brown, with a demon dog. 

In the end, Joan was acquitted, Elizabeth was imprisoned but not executed (until 13 years later when she was tried again and finally executed), and Anges was executed by hanging.


The Witchfinder General

Matthew Hopkins, the famed “Witchfinder General” (though that title was never actually given by Parliament), was believed to have accused and executed more witches in his brutal 14-month reign of terror than any other witch hunter in the 160 years preceding him. 

Between March of 1644 until the end of his terror in 1647, it’s said that Matthew Hopkins was responsible for over 100 executions of suspected witches. 

Though torture was supposed to be outlawed in England at the time, this didn’t stop the infamous Witchfinder General from using torturous techniques to extract confessions from his prisoners. His preferred methods of getting confessions were trial by water, pricking, sleep deprivation, and the finding of a Devil’s or Witch’s Mark.

Trial by water was performed by tossing an accused witch into a body of water to see if she would sink or float. It was believed that the water represented baptism and since witches rejected their baptisms, the water would reject them. Thus, if they floated, it was proof that the water wouldn’t allow them to submerge, so they had to be witches.

To find a Witch’s Mark, women and men accused of witchcraft were shaved of all their body hair while Hopkins would search for any kind of mole, scar, or other skin imperfection, which he claimed would be the source of nutrition for a witch’s familiar. If no Witch’s Mark was found, Hopkins would claim that it was invisible, and so would resort to pricking. Pricking was the practice of using a knife or needle to poke at a suspected witch. If the person didn’t bleed – as was often the case because Hopkins tended to use dull or special needles – it was proof of witchery.

Hopkins retired from witch-hunting in 1647 after he, himself, was accused of witchcraft due to his unlawful methods of confession extraction and torture.


The Last Witch

Though the history of witches in Britain doesn’t end in 1727, the lawful executions of witches did. The last witch to be executed lawfully in Britain was Janet Horne. 

In 1727, Janet Horne and her daughter were accused of witchcraft by their neighbors. Janet was in the stages of senility, and her daughter, whose name is not recorded, allegedly had deformations on her hands and feet. Thus, her neighbors accused Janet of riding her daughter like a horse, at night, to consort with the devil, which is why the daughter’s hands and feet were deformed.

The trial was quick and incredibly unjust, and the sheriff quickly decided both were guilty and would be executed by means of burning at the stake. Janet’s daughter, luckily, was able to escape, but Janet was stripped naked, covered in tar, and paraded through town before being burnt alive.


The history of witches in Britain is vast and lengthy. It cannot all be covered in a single article, so we chose to showcase what we deemed the most interesting or important parts. But the fact of the matter is, from antiquity to present times, Britain has an extensive and varied history with witches and witchcraft.

Things that would qualify you as a witch in 1692

Things That Would Qualify You as a Witch in 1692

Witch hysteria began in Salem in January of 1692 when two young girls, Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams, fell ill. Betty, as Elizabeth was known, was the daughter of Reverend Samuel Parris, and Abigail was his niece. They had fits that included uncontrollable outbursts of screaming and violent bodily contortions. After a doctor couldn’t diagnose their illnesses, he told Reverend Parris that they had been the victims of witchcraft. Between January 1692 and the spring of 1693, over 150 people were accused of witchcraft, and 19 of them were hanged. When the hysteria was at its peak, almost anything could get you accused of being in league with the devil. Below, we’ll talk about some of the sillier things that would qualify you as a witch in 1692.

  1. Having a Vagina

Yes, simply being in possession of a vagina made you 80% more likely to be accused of witchcraft than someone without one. This was because it was believed that women were more susceptible to sin, and thus more susceptible to the devil’s trickery and temptations. 

  1. Being Too Poor

If you sometimes have trouble supporting yourself and have to resort to asking your community or friends for help, you could have been a suspected witch in 1692. One of the first women hanged for witchcraft in Salem was Sarah Good, a poor woman who often begged her friends and neighbors for food, and was thus disliked and distrusted by the community. Due to this, they accused her of witchcraft.

  1. Being Too Rich

Are you self-made without the need of a man or family to help you financially? If yes, then you’re obviously a witch. In the 17th century, it was believed impossible for a woman to be financially comfortable – or even stable – without the help of a man, which meant she had to be in league with the devil.

  1. Having No Friends

Are you an introvert? BURN HER! BURN THE WITCH! Women who were shy or had trouble making friends were often accused of witchcraft because they were easy targets. With no one to stand up for them, the trials were a breeze, and off to Gallows Hill they were marched.

  1. Having Too Many Friends

On the flip side, if you are an extreme extrovert with a whole squad of awesome women surrounding you, you’re also a witch. The famed Witchfinder General, Matthew Hopkins, started this rumor after he happened upon a group of women chatting together and having a good time. He called them a coven and accused them of chanting incantations. They were executed.

  1. Being Too Old

Older women were an easy target for witch hysteria. Whether married or not, it was believed that only the work of the devil could help a woman get to an advanced age, and so seniors were often accused of witchery. Rebecca Nurse, a septuagenarian, with a husband, children, and many grandchildren, who was also a respected member of the community, was hanged for witchcraft because of her advanced age.

  1. Being Too Young

Are you starting to see a pattern here? Quite literally, no one was safe from the accusations of witchcraft in 17th century Salem. Dorothy Good, daughter of Sarah Good, was accused, at the ripe old age of four, of witchcraft. Her accusers claimed she bit them and attacked them like an animal. After being interrogated for two weeks, Dorothy broke down and admitted to whatever her accusers were saying. She was imprisoned for four months, an ordeal which left her with permanent and extreme psychological damage.

  1. Having Too Few/No Kids

Being married and having no or too few children was grounds for execution for witchcraft. The devil must have cursed you and your unholy womb with infertility. Additionally, if any of your neighbors who had a lot of children found themselves with problems, it was obviously because the childless crone next door had put a curse on them due to jealousy. 

  1. Having Too Many Kids

Of course, on the other hand, if you had too many children, you were obviously performing witchcraft and stealing the babies that would have been born to the infertile couple next door. 

  1. Being Kind to Animals

You better not let anyone see you cooing to the cute dog down the street, or petting the stray cat behind your house because everyone knows that people who are kind to animals are witches! Believing in the idea that all witches had familiars – animals that would help them in the devilry – this meant that any woman caught talking to or paying attention to an animal would automatically be assumed to be a witch and put on trial.

  1. Being Eccentric Or Loud

Talking to yourself, being different from the rest of society, or even being too loud and sassy was a surefire way to get you put on trial. Women in the 17th century were supposed to be quiet, calm, submissive, God-fearing Christians. If you displayed any kind of characteristic that went against these traits, you qualified as a witch.

  1. Being Able To Swim

The ability to swim was not as widespread in 1692 Salem as it is now. One of the reasons trial by water became so popular during witch trials was because it was believed that if a person, once dropped in water, was able to make it back to the surface, evil forces had to be at work. 

  1. You Made Someone Angry

At the height of the Salem Witch Trials, people were accusing each other left and right. All it took was for you to upset someone, or make someone angry, or, in the case of Rebecca Nurse, accidentally bump into someone at church, and they would accuse you of witchcraft.

  1. You have birthmarks

Called the Witch’s Mark, any birthmark, or mole, or scar, or tiny skin imperfection you had was all it took for you to suddenly be a suspected witch. It was believed that through these Witch’s Marks, the witch would feed her family her blood.

  1. You Had Spoiled Dairy Products

During the Salem Witch Trials, something as simple as your butter or milk spoiling could qualify you as a witch. Essentially, anything out of the ordinary that happened in everyday life that the people of the time couldn’t understand was blamed on witchcraft, including spoiled dairy products. Several people claimed that their butter had gone bad in the presence of a witch on trial. This was considered evidence against her.


1692 was a dangerous time. Literally, anything could be misconstrued or misunderstood and that would automatically qualify them as a witch. To learn more about the witch trials, check out our blog about the weird tests they performed to prove someone was guilty of witchcraft in the 17th century.

What do Sagittarius Leo and Aries have in common

What do Sagittarius, Leo, and Aries have in common?

If you’re interested in the zodiac, then you likely know at least a little bit about Sagittarius, Leo, and Aries, but do you know what these three feisty signs have in common? Of course, three of these zodiac signs are fire signs. Sagittarius is ruled by Jupiter, Leo by the Sun, and Aries by Mars. Fire signs are passionate and bold, unafraid to take the road less traveled when they believe it will lead them to their purpose. Fire signs are known for their passion, creativity, spontaneity, inspiration, and strong-willed spirit.

1) The Sagittarian

An explorer at heart, the Sagittarian values freedom above all else. No matter where they are located on earth, there is a constant quest for adventure. They have a lust for life that fuels their every waking moment. The farther away from home they are, or whatever situation or activity they find themselves in, it’s always an opportunity to learn something new about their world or themselves. Intellectual and talkative, constantly learning is one of their favorite pastimes, along with exploring wherever they are visiting. People born under this fire sign will definitely never be bored! Life is too short to spend time being bored or unhappy, so it’s time to get out and see what other people’s lives look like beyond your own.

Sagittarians have an unbridled optimism that shines upon every aspect of their life. Life should be full of fun experiences, so live life to its fullest while you can! It would be a shame if you didn’t live up to your full potential by not knowing what you’re capable of. Your curiosity will lead you down many paths before your journey here on earth comes to an end, so don’t put limits on yourself just because others have already placed limitations upon themselves. As friends, Sagittarians are insightful, wise, and honest, but they can also be blunt and too direct. They struggle to share their truths with tact and sensitivity. They are great to have around as their talkative, sociable nature makes it easy for them to connect with everyone.

2) The Leo

This fire sign is an extrovert who loves to be around people and sports surprisingly thin skin. Criticism can pierce them deeply. They crave affirmation, praise, and validation. Leos are always willing to lend a helping hand. These generous individuals like everything to be just right for them before getting started, but once they’re on board with a project or team, it’s impossible to stop them from blazing ahead. Leos are like the sun: warm, constant, shining on all those in their orbit.  They are fixed, steady, predictable friends who love to-do lists, can be resistant to change, and take time to adapt to pivots.

In romance, Leos take center stage. They love being adored by their partner and will go out of their way to put a smile on their face. They need their partners to lavish them with affection and prove their love and loyalty. Once they are settled into a trusting relationship, they make playful, affectionate partners that enjoy keeping things hot and heavy. Leos are secretly sensitive though. They are quick to put up a brave face when hurt, but inside, they are more vulnerable than their fiery-lion outside would let on.

3) The Aries

The first quality of an Aries that people typically notice is their creative (fiery) energy. This fire sign is always on the move, putting their independent and entrepreneurial spirit into action. Aries-born individuals make up some of the most inspiring leaders, and can get even the most “stuck” people moving with their energetic, motivating attitude. Their energy is infectious and they have a limitless curiosity for everything (including new projects). This makes them an exciting friend to hang out with. They are somewhat competitive, but love to celebrate and uplift their friends.

Aries also have a child-like fascination with the world and a sense of adventure that can be a little reckless and impulsive at times. They don’t like to be told what to do and avoid being controlled at all costs. They do far better being their own boss than having to answer to someone else. Their boundless energy is best channeled in physical activity (preferably outdoors), or challenging projects that they can pour their whole heart and mind into.


If you’re born under an astrological fire sign, your potential is incredible! If not, then you would gain much by befriending a Sagittarius, Leo, or Aries to reap the benefits of their fiery personalities.

10 Most Mind Blowing Ways Christianity Stole From Paganismmm

10 Most Mind-Blowing Ways Christianity Stole

When Christianity spread throughout the Roman Empire, it didn’t come without controversy. The Romans saw Christians as hostile heathens who rejected the religion of their ancestors. But many of the customs practiced by early Christians were actually borrowed from the pagans they so despised, all as a means of converting the Pagans to Christianity. Here are the 10 most mind-blowing ways Christianity stole from Paganism!

1) The Number 12

The number 12 has an important place in both Pagan and Christian traditions. Pagans worshipped a number of gods, usually 12, but also 22, 32, or 36 depending on the region. Early Christians paid homage to Jesus’ 12 apostles and even today it is said that he will return to Earth with his 12 disciples. Likewise, early Pagans often built temples in groups of 12, with circular designs like Stonehenge (in England) or The Sanctuary at Corsepius (in Turkey). Today, Christians are encouraged to welcome Jesus into their lives through 12 steps programs like Alcoholics Anonymous. 12 is also considered a good omen because many people believe it has no imperfections.

2) Christmas Trees

Early Christians were called tree worshippers by Romans who noted their custom of decorating Christmas trees during holidays. The first documented use of Christmas trees was in Germany in 1521. The ancient Greeks and Scandinavians also decorated trees to celebrate the Winter Solstice, but it is uncertain if they were using evergreen or just hung ornaments on their trees. Early Pagans would bring evergreen branches into their homes and decorate them to bring light and life into the home during the dreary winter months. It has been suggested that Pagan cults worshipped sacred groves of evergreens, thus giving rise to modern-day Christmas tree traditions, but there is no hard evidence to support these theories.

3) Fish

If you’ve ever partaken in a Communion service, you’re familiar with its origins: Jesus performed his first miracle at a wedding by turning water into wine. (The first documented Communion ritual was practiced in Alexandria and involved bread and wine.) The fish symbol appeared on early Christian tombstones and other artifacts as a nod to Jesus, who stated that he will make you fishers of men. But the reality is that the symbol of the fish finds its roots in Paganism. The Christian symbol of the fish, called the Ichthys, even gets its name from a Pagan God, coincidentally named Ichthys, who was the son of the sea goddess, Atargatis, in Babylonian mythology. Pagans worshipped the symbol of the fish, often drawn by two intersecting crescent moons, as a symbol of fertility, believing it resembled a woman’s womb, thus representing the monthly cycle.

4) Fire

In ancient times, humans used fire as a tool for cooking, keeping warm, and light. In addition to these benefits, fire also had religious significance in many cultures. It was believed that divine forces were responsible for providing fire to humankind and so certain rituals were performed to appease these gods. Fire rituals were performed by Ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Hebrews, Incas, Native Americans, and many other cultures around the world. One of these Pagan beliefs is represented in Christmas celebrations where families gather together around a Christmas tree, which has lights adorned on it. Lights that, in ancient times, were actual candles, not the string lights we see today.

5) Easter and Easter Eggs

Pagans and Christians alike observed that eggs were a magical and unique thing: they start out in a lifeless shell and turn into a living, breathing animal over time. It didn’t take long for Pagans to adopt eggs as symbolic of new life, springtime, and transformation, while in Christianity, eggs, and Easter eggs, in particular, symbolize Jesus’ resurrection and emerging from his tomb after three days. Like with many Christian holy days, the holiday known today as Easter got its origins from the Pagan festival of Ostara, a celebration of the Vernal Equinox. 

6) The Virgin Birth

Think Mary was the first virgin to give birth to a god, demi-god, or son of God? Think again! Virgin births have been around in mythologies for centuries before Jesus. One of the earliest mythologies of an immaculate conception was that of the Egyptian God Horus, borne of the virgin Isis. Other virgin births prior to Jesus consist of Zoroaster, Mithra (who’s birthday is also written as December 25th), Krishna, and the Tien-Tse (Sons of Heaven) in China, among others.

7) Death and Resurrection

Like the myth of the virgin birth, Jesus’ resurrection cannot be solely (or even primarily) attributed to Christianity. 5000 years before Jesus’ death and resurrection, the Egyptian God, Osiris was killed and resurrected (more than once!). Osiris’ son, Horus, was also killed and resurrected. Moving onto Greek mythology, Adonis, Hermes, Dionysus, and Herakles all died and were resurrected. Other deities who were killed and subsequently resurrected include Tammuz of Babylonian mythology, Zarathustra, Mithra, and Krishna. The latter of which was believed to be crucified as well.

8) Longer Days at Easter

The earliest Christians may have decided to celebrate Easter on a Sunday because it meant they could worship for longer. During some years, Easter would be celebrated on April 21st or 22nd, rather than March 25th—but Christians still kept their firstfruits celebrations by congregating in church. Pagans, on the other hand, held celebrations at night since they thought that’s when spirits were most likely to wander into our world. It’s no wonder that Christians started celebrating Easter sunrise services!

9) Sunday Rest Days

The ancient Romans had a day of rest on Sunday. The ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Persians, and even ancient Jews had a concept of a day of rest. Some have speculated that Christians stole their Sabbath from Pagans, but it’s possible that all religions were taking a page from history.

10) Christmas

The Christmas tree tradition can be traced to Pagan practices in Germanic Europe. Heathens decorated fir trees in honor of their god, Thor, around December 24—the same day that early Christians used to celebrate Christ’s birth. But the theft from Paganism goes far deeper than simply Christmas trees. The entire holiday of Christmas – you know, the supposed day of Jesus’ birth? – was stolen from the Germanic celebration of Yule, and the Roman festival of Saturnalia. Though it is widely accepted that Jesus’ birth coincides with Christmas Day, historical texts suggest that Jesus was, instead, born in the Spring, however, in an effort to convert Pagans, who were very attached to their holy days, early Christians adopted Pagan celebrations and renamed them. 


Written by Vehemence 

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20 Moon-Worthy Ways to Use Moon Water

Moon water has many wonderful and magical uses that can be incorporated into your daily rituals and practices. Moon water, also known as rose water, provides much more than just hydration and flavor to your food and drinks; it can be used in self-care practices and to cleanse sacred spaces as well as use in your beauty routine. In fact, many people make their own moon water because it’s said to be more powerful than store-bought varieties because it’s been blessed by the moon herself. These are 20 moon-worthy ways to use moon water!

Floating Candles
Whether you’re practicing candle magic or just want a convenient way to light your home, floating candles are perfect for illuminating any space. To make moon water floating candles, fill a clear glass vase with moon water and place a white tealight in it. Position it somewhere in your house where it will reflect the moonlight. The best times of day for using moon water candles are from dawn until noon because they absorb sunlight energy during these hours and emit it during twilight. It’s important to be careful when lighting because most contain combustible materials that can cause fires or burns if not used correctly. Don’t burn candles directly under anything that can catch fire, including curtains and rugs.

Use In Watercolors
Moon water can be used in many ways during meditation. Some use it in their baths, while others use it in rituals or when making magic. And, of course, there are those who simply love how moon water feels on their skin when they’re relaxing. If you want to reap these benefits, you’ll need a small bottle of pure moon water with which to paint—or at least have on hand for easy access. Though it may seem difficult, creating your own moon water is actually quite simple! All you need to do is leave water out underneath the moon. That’s it!

Infuse with Fruits, Crystals, and Herbs
Infusing moon water with all sorts of ingredients is a great method for use in your daily rituals. You can infuse moon water with fruit crystals, herbs, leaves, peels, and flowers. The combinations are endless! Try these ideas for starters:

– Honeydew Melon and Raspberry with Aventurine, Rose Quartz, and Withania Somnifera for fertility, love, beauty, protection, abundance, and lunar magic.

– Strawberry, Lime, and Cucumber with Peridot, Topaz, and Rosemary for love, chastity, fertility, healing, fortune, peace, and protection.

– Raspberry, Rose Petal, and Vanilla with Jasper, Amethyst, and Basil for love, protection, divination, healing, psychic abilities. happiness, and lust.

Moon Water Scrying
To clear your mind, put a small amount of moon water in a bowl and light some candles around it. As you inhale the fragrant smoke, cup your hands around your eyes and look through them into the bowl. Be mindful not to focus on any one thing; instead, let all thoughts go as you simply gaze into it. You’ll be amazed at what arises—just make sure to jot it down later!

Cleansing Spray
Cleaning yourself and your living space with moon water can help you prepare for your next ritual. A few drops of lemon essential oil and a couple of sprigs of rosemary-infused in a spray bottle are all you need. Add about 2 ounces of water and 1 teaspoon of kosher salt to mix it up, and feel free to adjust as needed and enjoy! If you’ve made an infusion with herbs or fruit crystals, keep it in a dark cabinet—like one used for storing food—for continued potency.

Diffuse Essential Oils
Not only do essential oils have aromatherapeutic properties, but adding them to your moon water allows you to select a scent that fits whatever mood you’re in. This is one of my favorite ways of using moon water—particularly on full moons, which are also good times for cleansing rituals. The relaxing properties of lavender, peppermint, and chamomile are great for unwinding after a long day.

Bless Sacred Space
Moon water is believed to cleanse, bless, and protect people, places, and things. If you’re looking for an effective way to bless sacred spaces—whether that be your home or garden—try making moon water. It has subtle energy that makes it perfect for cleansing space with intention. There are many different ways of using moon water. 

Open Third Eye
The Full Moon (when it’s shining directly overhead, making its light stronger and more intense) is an ideal time for opening our third eye. If you’re not familiar with your third eye (also known as your inner eye or mind’s eye), it is simply your brain stem (the bottom part of your pineal gland). The full moon can be used as a tool to open that portion of our mind, helping us connect to our intuition.

Put In Flower Vase
Maybe you love your usual floral arrangements, but they don’t always stand out in a small space. So, what about using moon water in place of actual flowers? You can add moon water to any existing floral arrangement or create your own with just moon water and vases.

Cleanse Scrying Mirror
It’s said that a mirror becomes clearer and more reflective after it’s been cleaned with moon water, making it a powerful tool for scrying—the art of seeing your future by gazing into a still or running body of water. All you need is a glass mirror, two drops of moon water, and a bowl of still water. Place your face close to the bowl, dip a towel in moon water, then gently wipe away any dust or dirt from your mirror.

Make Ice Cubes
Make a big batch of moon water and put it in ice cube trays. Label and freeze them for the next time you need a drink or want to use moon water for a spell. If you do not have trays, no worries. You can place your moon water into individual Ziploc bags, label them, then place them into your freezer until ready to use.

Water Plants
As we’ve already discussed, essential oils and flower essences can be easily infused into water. It’s a great way to get more of these superpowers inside your body without having to take capsules or swallow pastilles. Another fun use for moon water is keeping it in an open vase on your kitchen table or living room floor, where you can glance at it throughout the day and get a subtle dose of your favorite plants and herbs with every glance. What better way is there than that to stay in tune with nature?

Apply to $$$ to Promote Prosperity
Whether you’re putting it in your tea, bathing with it, or making an offering, moon water is a traditional way of harnessing magical powers for prosperity. And luckily, there are a few ways to spend $$$ that bring more luck than giving it away! The next time you want some quick cash in your pocket (or maybe in your purse—who knows), try blessing yourself and someone else with moon water—it’s one of many fun ways to empower yourself through ritual. 

Charge Sigils
Depending on what you’re doing with your moon water, you may want to charge your sigil beforehand. In an empty glass jar, dissolve a tablespoon of white sugar in 2 cups of water. Add one tablespoon of salt and stir well. Let it sit out overnight with a sigil or intention written on a piece of paper taped or tied around it under a light source, such as a candle or incandescent bulb. Keep it under light for at least 24 hours. This is a simple way to charge any sigil, whether it’s related to moon water or not!

Add to Smoothies
Smoothies are a great way to include fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet, especially if you don’t like to eat them on your own. They can be used as meal replacements or snacks. Combining ingredients with high water content (like melons) and some that release lots of water when cooked (like cucumbers) creates a beverage that is light and healthy, perfect for hot summer days. Throw in a little moon water charged with intention and not only is it a healthy snack but a blessed one!

Add to a Bath (my favorite)
Whether you believe in its restorative powers or not, most of us can agree that taking a bath is one of life’s most luxurious rituals. The soft lighting of candles, music playing—it’s easy to see why it’s an activity almost universally cherished by all humans. A bath is also a great place for reflection and inspiration. So when you combine these two activities together, what do you get? Something truly magical. You can immerse your whole body in the wondrous magic of moon water, by adding it to your bath!

Add Lavender for Toner
The scent of lavender can be relaxing, but it’s also cleansing and purifying. Add a few drops of lavender oil to your moon water (and any other water you use throughout your day) for a soothing aroma. Likewise, sage is considered beneficial for spirituality; boil some in your tea or use it as an essential oil diffuser scent. For glowing skin, try adding lemon juice to your water; it’s said that lemons are healing for both body and spirit.

Cleanse Crystals and Tools
Crystals are important tools for magick, but they also need regular cleansing. To cleanse them, first dissolve 1 tablespoon of sea salt into 4 cups of moon water. Soak your crystals in it for 2 hours before drying with a soft cloth. This will clear away negative energy and return your crystals to their original shine.

Make Tea (or coffee)
One of the best ways to get started with moon water is to make a cup of tea (herbal tea works too!).  If you’re not sure what types of herbs you like (or where to start), don’t worry! Start out by mixing things together and see what flavors you like; there are thousands upon thousands of combinations that will give you different effects based on your magical practice.

Make Your Own Soap
Traditionally, moon water is made by soaking herbs in water under a full moon and letting it sit until it attains a pale color. It’s said that moon water should only be used during blue moons, but don’t worry—there are ways around that. The first way is to infuse your herbal mixture with natural dye made from fruit crystals or floral oil, which will give it pigment.

Charge Water-Loving Crystals
It’s a well-known fact that water is absolutely crucial for life on Earth. Thanks to its unique molecular structure, our planet’s abundant H2O makes it possible for life as we know it to exist because it creates an environment where cells can thrive. Our bodies are made up of up to 60% water; so, you might say there’s nothing quite like having some nearby! Luckily, crystals love H2O as well…especially these crystal essences! But not all crystals love water! Don’t get any of these wet: amber, turquoise, red coral, fire opal, moonstone, calcite, kyanite, kunzite, angelite, azurite, selenite. A good rule of thumb: Many stones that end in “ite” are not water-friendly.)

Do you use moon water for anything in your practice? Let us know in the comments!